36th Annual Kentucky Heritage Council Archaeology Conference March 1 – 3, 2019: Deadline for Reservations Approaching

A block of rooms has been reserved at the Hampton Inn and Suites Newport/Cincinnati, 275 Columbia Street in Newport. When calling (859-415-0678) or booking online (http://group.hamptoninn.com/archaeologyconference) please use the group name, “Archaeology Conference.” The block of rooms is available for arrival on March 1 departing on March 3, 2019. Please make sure to book your rooms as much in advance as possible. The discounted rate … Continue reading 36th Annual Kentucky Heritage Council Archaeology Conference March 1 – 3, 2019: Deadline for Reservations Approaching

Update to Call for Papers and Posters 36th Annual Kentucky Heritage Council Archaeology Conference March 1 – 3, 2019 Northern Kentucky University

The 36th Annual Kentucky Heritage Council Archaeology Conference will be hosted in partnership with Northern Kentucky University, and the Kentucky Organization of Professional Archaeologists. The conference will take place at the Landrum Academic Center on the campus of Northern Kentucky University (Building #12.) Those interested in presenting a paper or poster should send an abstract (100 words maximum) no later than January 30, 2019 to: … Continue reading Update to Call for Papers and Posters 36th Annual Kentucky Heritage Council Archaeology Conference March 1 – 3, 2019 Northern Kentucky University

Call for Papers and Posters: 36th Annual Kentucky Heritage Council Archaeology Conference, March 1 – 3, 2019 Northern Kentucky University

The 36th Annual Kentucky Heritage Council Archaeology Conference will be hosted in partnership with Northern Kentucky University, and the Kentucky Organization of Professional Archaeologists. The conference will take place at the Landrum Academic Center on the campus of Northern Kentucky University (Building #12 on the map.) Those interested in presenting a paper or poster should send an abstract (100 words maximum) no later than January … Continue reading Call for Papers and Posters: 36th Annual Kentucky Heritage Council Archaeology Conference, March 1 – 3, 2019 Northern Kentucky University

In Memory of Tom Sanders

This year during Kentucky Archaeology Month, staff were sad to learn of the recent passing of our former colleague, Tom Sanders, who retired from KHC as Site Protection program administrator in 2004 after 30 years with the agency. Tom started out as a staff archaeologist working on a comprehensive statewide archaeological survey. He subsequently supervised archaeological activities and education, worked with historic buildings and grants … Continue reading In Memory of Tom Sanders

Save the Date: KHC Archaeology Conference 2019

  The Kentucky Heritage Council’s 36th annual Archaeology Conference is scheduled for Friday, March 1 through Sunday, March 3, 2019 and will be held at Northern Kentucky University. A block of hotel rooms has been reserved at the Hampton Inn and Suites, 275 Columbia Street, Newport, Kentucky. The rate ranges from $139.00 to $149.00 per night, depending on what type of room you prefer. If … Continue reading Save the Date: KHC Archaeology Conference 2019

Kentucky: The Land Where Buffalo Never Roamed

That’s right, buffalo never roamed the fertile river valleys of Kentucky.  The large creatures observed by 18th century European colonists were not actually buffalo.  The name buffalo was mistakenly applied to these creatures by early colonists and has stuck ever since.  Scientifically speaking, buffalo (Syncerus caffer and Bubalus bubalis) are animals that live in Africa and Asia, while the large game animals of 18th century … Continue reading Kentucky: The Land Where Buffalo Never Roamed

What are Lithics?

I am an archaeologist who is fascinated by tools made from rocks. These tools are known by many names: arrowheads, axes, stone tools, projectile points, knives, spears, etc. Yet archaeologists will often use the term lithics, (i.e., lithic artifacts) when talking about them. Well, to paraphrase Shakespeare, a rose by any other name would smell as sweet.   Often called “arrowheads,” points like these were … Continue reading What are Lithics?

Nicole’s Definition of Archaeology

So, here is how this blog came about. My friend, Karen Stevens and I share the sentiment that one of the most important things archaeologists should do is to share our passion and knowledge with the public. To learn better how to do this, we recently attended a Public Archaeology Symposium at Glenn A. Black Laboratory of Indiana University, Bloomington. The keynote speaker was Dr. … Continue reading Nicole’s Definition of Archaeology

Discovering Boone’s Station

In 1999, in cooperation with Dr. Don Linebaugh and Nancy O’Malley of the University of Kentucky, conductivity and magnetometry surveys were completed of the site of Daniel Boone’s second Kentucky settlement (following Boonesborough) located near Athens, Kentucky, and known as Boone’s Station. This work, part of an archaeological field school conducted through the University, explored the nature of the station and how it changed through … Continue reading Discovering Boone’s Station